Mittelfristig (1 bis 5 Jahre)
Mikro (Individuum)
Ökonomisch
2020

increased voluntary involvement of youth workers in order to provde high performativity

organisationaler Aufstieg und Selbstverwirklichung

Part-timers in my study were well aware that in order to be seen as ‘good’ and advance in their careers, they must embrace and implement monitoring and impact mechanisms. Some volunteered for additional and often unpaid responsibilities around the administration of evaluation and monitoring, such as gathering evidence and filling in databases. [...] Despite the ambivalence John expresses here, his involvement in monitoring made him feel ‘involved’ while positioning him as promising and competent, doing the work of a full-timer. Workers can recognise the inappropriateness of measurement while at the same time finding it strangely alluring. This can be particularly true of part-timers who often feel excluded from ‘what’s going on’ – and where involvement in ‘what’s going on’ means playing a greater role in evaluation.

Beschreibung der Aktivität

settingübergreifend
youth work activities in a variety of organisations including local authority youth services, charities and social enterprises
youth work activities in a variety of organisations including local authority youth services, charities and social enterprises
Großbritannien
PraktikerInnen/ JugendarbeiterInnen/ MentorInnen
PraktikerInnen/JugendarbeiterInnen/MentorInnen

Evaluierung der Aktivität

Qualitative Interviewbefragungen (persönlich), Fokusgruppen
The data was collected over a period of three years between early 2011 and late 2013 through in-depth semi-structured interviews and focus groups involving 35 youth workers in different areas of England, alongside ethnographically-informed participant observation in two youth organisations in East London. [...] Twenty-two youth workers took part in semi-structured, in-depth interviews of between one and three hours in length. These interviews took place in their workplaces or local cafés, using an open conversational approach inspired by feminism, ethnography and grounded theory, in which the interviewee is given space to shape the interview (Oakley 1990; Hammersley and Atkinson 1995; Charmaz 2006).
35 youth workers
early 2011 to late 2013